A Brief Guide to Norse Mythology for Young and Old Flora J. Cooke

ISBN:

Published: June 15th 2012

Kindle Edition

19 pages


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A Brief Guide to Norse Mythology for Young and Old  by  Flora J. Cooke

A Brief Guide to Norse Mythology for Young and Old by Flora J. Cooke
June 15th 2012 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 19 pages | ISBN: | 8.35 Mb

This easy-to-understand guide to Norse mythology (equivalent in length to a physical book of approximately 24 pages) consists of three parts. Part I presents an overview of Norse mythology. Part II describes, in alphabetical order, 16 different gods,MoreThis easy-to-understand guide to Norse mythology (equivalent in length to a physical book of approximately 24 pages) consists of three parts. Part I presents an overview of Norse mythology. Part II describes, in alphabetical order, 16 different gods, goddesses, heroes, places, and things, including Odin, Loki, Balder, Freya, Frigga, Heimdall, and Thor.

Part III contains three full-length Greek myths—“The Death of Balder,” The Fenris Wolf,” and “The Gifts the Dwarfs Made.”Most of the material that makes up this book was written especially for, and originally published in, the esteemed multi-volume reference work “World Book: Organized Knowledge in Story and Picture” (1920).Sample passages:(from Part I) In the beginning, declare the Norse myths, there was no world, but just a great formless abyss. To the north were mist and darkness- to the south fire and light- and out of the mist world there flowed twelve rivers which emptied into the abyss and were frozen there.

Fiery blasts from the fire world melted this ice, and a vapor arose that condensed, came to life, and became the giant Ymir, father of all the giants. From the same source was formed the huge cow, Adhumbla, whose milk fed the giant, while she nourished herself by licking the salt from the ice. As she licked she uncovered first the head, then the whole form of Bori, the first of the gods, from whom all the other gods were descended.(from Part II) Balder was the god who personified the sun and the charm of summer.

He was the son of Odin and Frigga, and was a general favorite with the gods and goddesses because of his beauty and goodness. His one enemy was the wicked Loki, who hated him and plotted his destruction. Balder’s mother, fearing that he might be harmed, had exacted from all the things in the world, except only a small spray of mistletoe that grew on an oak tree, a promise that they would not injure her son. The gods, therefore, made a pastime of hurling their dangerous weapons at Balder, that they might enjoy the sport of seeing them fall harmlessly to the ground.

But the scheming Loki made a dart from the mistletoe, and this he put into the hand of Balder’s blind brother, telling him how to throw it. As the dart struck Balder, he fell dead.(from Part III) Sif, Thor’s wife, was most beautiful, with her blue eyes, fair skin, and golden hair. Her hair! It was the most glorious hair that had ever grown on anyone’s head—bright and soft and fine, and so long and heavy that when she let it down it covered her from head to foot like a golden veil. Of course she was very proud of it, and of course Thor was proud of it too and loved to watch her shake it out so that it shone and rippled like a golden waterfall in the sun.

One morning when she woke, Sif found that her hair had been cut off close to her head. A look into her polished silver mirror showed her that the most of her beauty had gone with her hair, and she scarcely dared face her husband- but when she told Thor his anger was terrible to behold.About the Author:Flora J. Cooke (1864-1953) was the first principal of Chicago’s Francis W.

Parker School.



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